December 14, 2018

Shopping for Icicle Holiday Lights

Icicle Holiday Lights–Big Business

Icicle holiday lights have rapidly become one of the biggest trends in the outside Christmas lights.  Just look around your neighborhood anytime after Thanksgiving, and often even before and this is the xmas lighting trend you’re likely to see the most of.  If you’re thinking of joining the pack or even updating your current supply of icicle Christmas lights, here’s what you need to know.

Icicle Lights in Living Color

Icicle lights aren’t just cascading streams of little white Christmas lights anymore.  While some icicle lights retain this original design, many creative versions have spun off this original concept.  Variations in the length of the drops can give the bulbs a much thicker, richer effect.  Color has been added to the familiar icicle lights.  Look for them in the usual white as well as variations in blue, green, red, pink and purple.  For holidays other than Christmas you can find icicle lights in orange, green and even red, white and blue.

Icicle Lights Take Shape

shopping for icicle holiday lightsThe creativity of holiday light manufacturers doesn’t just end with color.  Increasingly there is more and more variety in the shape of icicle lights.  We’ve searched long and hard and found actual lights formed into molded icicles.  Even more unique are icicle lights in the form of stars, Snowflakes, and dangling candy canes.  You can find some of these at www.secureshopping.mcaffee.com/shop/icicle-lights.   For other holidays consider icicle lights in the shape of shamrocks, spiders and hearts.  You’ll find a selection of these items at www.bizrate.com/halloween.decor/oid874690758.html

Where to Find Icicle Lights

You can find icicle lights for the holidays in lots of shopping outlets.  Mass merchants like Walmart, Target, and K-Mart carry a number of low-priced styles each season.  Hardware stores such as Ace also offer the low-cost variety as do home centers such as Home Depot and Lowe’s.  For a more unique selection look to shops that specialize in high-end home décor.  You might like the unusual selections to be found at Little Traveler in Geneva, Illinois or Just Ducky Stores in Naperville and Bolingbrook, Illinois.  For east coasters consider taking a trip over to Fountains of Wayne in Wayne, New Jersey.  You’re sure to find a mind boggling assortment of lights to choose from in that Christmas mecca.  In Michigan, you might try Bronner’s Christmas Wonderland in Frankenmuth.

Chistmaslights the Easy Way

If shopping in person isn’t your style, let your fingers do the walking by surfing the internet. Here you’ll find an endless supply and variety of icicle holiday lights.  And, if you’d rather not contend with this project yourself or feel the need to purchase the finest quality, long-lasting icicle lights possible, consider consulting a Christmas lighting contractor.  These businesses can provide you a custom-designed and installed display or simply sell you the finest quality and most unique icicle lights to be found.  We even hear an unusual type of permanent Christmas lights are hitting the streets–invisible in summer and available at the touch of a switch in winter.  For information on this type of lighting try www.hclights.com

Today’s Choice–Icicle Christmas Lights

Icicle Christmas lights are just the latest of a long string of outdoor lighting techniques used to light homes in celebration of Christmas.  A popular choice, they simulate dripping from the eaves of homes, and can frequently also be seen cascading from the branches of Christmas trees both indoors and out.

History of Festive Lighting

Just how did these and other types of lights become so important to our culture’s obsession with outdoor Christmas lighting?  Interestingly enough, festive lighting dates back to ancient times long before the advent of Christianity.  Acknowledging the importance of light to the harvest and to life itself, ancient cultures revered the presence of light in a spiritual sense and made use of it in the various festivals they celebrated.

Christmas Tree Lighting–A Modern Twist on Ancient History

Using light on trees seems to be rooted in ancient history as well.  The Druids of France and England considered the oak tree to be sacred and at festival times were believed to decorate them with candles.  Later, in early Christianity, it is said that Martin Luther attempted to recreate the beauty of stars lighting forest trees by bringing a candled tree into his home for his family to enjoy.  This practice is believed to have evolved into the German tradition of Christmas tree lighting.  From Germany, the tradition followed Prince Albert to England when he married Queen Victoria.

Similarly German settlers were credited with bringing Christmas tree lighting to the United States.  The first actual tree was believed to be displayed in Pennsylvania in 1851.  Lighting was kept to a minimum due to the fire hazard of placing lit candles on an indoor tree.  In fact, most trees were lit only on Christmas Eve and only for a few moments.  It took until Thomas Edison’s development of the electric light bulb and the subsequent manufacture of Christmas light bulbs for the trees to be lit for extended periods of time.

Although many of us can’t envision Christmas without Christmas tree lighting, the practice of bringing a tree indoors didn’t really catch on until after the first tree made its debut in the White House.  Unbelievably, this wasn’t until 1856. Most likely there was an attempt to be European and follow the traditions being popularized by England’s trend-setting Queen Victoria.

Festive Lighting–Not just Christmas Lites

Other cultures besides our own continue to use festive lighting.  Of particular note is the Jewish festival of Hanukkah, the Hindu festival of Diwali and the Thai festival of Loi Krathong.  Each of these festivals of light has a long history and like Christmas lighting has its roots in ancient peoples fascination and respect for the light of the sun and stars.